Chronic Disease Coalition hosts first Twitter chat

11.13.17

On October 30, 2017, the Chronic Disease Coalition hosted our very first Twitter chat, where we had the opportunity to connect with patients, hear their stories and the challenges they face daily. We were thrilled that so many of you participated! We continue to learn every day from those who fight “invisible” diseases.

During the chat, we asked participants nine different questions ranging from their experience with discrimination to how their disease has positively impacted their life. We asked participants to use #ChronicTogether, as a reminder that you are not alone in your disease or your battle – we are stronger together. Below are a few of our favorite highlights from the chat. A huge thanks to all who participated – we can’t wait until the next one!

When asked about the growing number of Americans who suffer from chronic disease (over 133 million Americans have been diagnosed with one or more chronic diseases), @Chronicpainwar recognized that our voice, together, has power:

We also asked about the first word that came to mind the day of diagnosis. Every participant had a vivid recollection of that day, and remembered the frustration, fear and, in some cases, relief:

All chronic patients have dealt with discrimination in one form or another…

…or have experienced difficulty with communicating with doctors about their disease:

We were shocked by the price of @Walk_With_Adam’s drug costs, especially what it would mean if his payments were rejected for accepting charitable premium assistance:

And hope he can continue to utilize charitable premium assistance to make sure he receives the critical care needed to fight his disease:

And while fighting a chronic disease is frustrating, difficult and demanding, we wanted to end on a positive note and are continually inspired by all of our #chronicfighters:

Hearing from patients and patient advocates is critical to CDC’s role in ensuring every voice is heard. Join us to see how you can help make sure chronic patients are heard.