Back to School During COVID-19

9.10.20

With class on the horizon or beginning for many young Americans, COVID-19 continues to leave many people wondering what is next and how can we protect our communities?

For chronic disease patients, returning to school poses even greater risk, causing many students to choose between their education and their safety.

In this week’s blog we will look at some helpful tips for chronic disease patients to safely attend class, whether in-person or online, and offer some ways you can protect yourself as schools and businesses across the nation begin to reopen.

In-Person learning:

Schools are reopening at different rates across the country, with some considering in-person physically distanced classes and others hosting classes entirely online, known as distance learning. Whatever your situation, it is important to remain aware and prepared to protect yourself and your family.

In July, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published an article outlining the importance of returning to school and how to keep your children safe as they return.

Each morning, before heading to school, the CDC recommends checking in with yourself and/or your child. Be sure to take your temperature, check for signs of illness, know of your school’s health contact and familiarize yourself with local testing facilities.

When heading out to in-person learning opportunities, it is also crucially important to expect the unexpected and prepare for anything. This includes, bringing extra masks, carrying at least 60% alcohol containing hand sanitizer, planning your transportation route, and ensuring safe distance from those in the classroom.

If you feel you cannot adequately protect yourself or your child when attending class in-person, it is important to consult with your doctor and consider other solutions that may better fit your specific needs.

Distance learning:

In some cases, schools are having students work entirely online. While this option may seem like the safer protection from COVID-19, there are still many things that students and parents should take into consideration when starting virtual learning.

The most important thing is to ensure you are properly equipped. Be sure to attend all your school’s meetings, remain informed on local health guidelines and create a schedule to help meet your educational goals. Check out this article from Tech at Home to learn more about the resources needed to ensure a seamless distance learning experience.

Taking classes online can also have a mental and emotional impact on students. According to the CDC, ensuring students mental and emotional well-being is met during distance learning is crucially important when deciding how to continue your education during COVID-19.

There are several things you can do to ensure valuable emotional and social time is met while learning online, including: Identify lunch times or virtual hang outs with other students, ask your school about connectivity plans, create opportunities to be physically active during the day and consider appropriate coping mechanisms for stress and anxiety.

In-person and online learning:

Many schools are also considering a mix of both learning styles considering COVID-19. In a recent article by the Washington Post, 44 percent of parents of children in K-12 schools wanted a mixture of both distance and in-class learning.

A mixture of both learning styles may help vulnerable students protect themselves against COVID-19 while still providing the important day-to-day social interactions afforded by traditional classrooms.

One thing is certain: chronic disease patients are facing a tough decision this fall, and ensuring you are properly informed and equipped to make the right decision is crucial in protecting your family, friends and community.

If you’re still unsure what is best for you or your child, be sure to review your school district’s online resources, ask questions and check out this helpful article from the CDC to ensure you and your school are properly equipped!

With class on the horizon or beginning for many young Americans, COVID-19 continues to leave many people wondering what is next and how can we protect our communities?

For chronic disease patients, returning to school poses even greater risk, causing many students to choose between their education and their safety.

In this week’s blog we will look at some helpful tips for chronic disease patients to safely attend class, whether in-person or online, and offer some ways you can protect yourself as schools and businesses across the nation begin to reopen.

In-Person learning:

Schools are reopening at different rates across the country, with some considering in-person physically distanced classes and others hosting classes entirely online, known as distance learning. Whatever your situation, it is important to remain aware and prepared to protect yourself and your family.

In July, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published an article outlining the importance of returning to school and how to keep your children safe as they return.

Each morning, before heading to school, the CDC recommends checking in with yourself and/or your child. Be sure to take your temperature, check for signs of illness, know of your school’s health contact and familiarize yourself with local testing facilities.

When heading out to in-person learning opportunities, it is also crucially important to expect the unexpected and prepare for anything. This includes, bringing extra masks, carrying at least 60% alcohol containing hand sanitizer, planning your transportation route, and ensuring safe distance from those in the classroom.

If you feel you cannot adequately protect yourself or your child when attending class in-person, it is important to consult with your doctor and consider other solutions that may better fit your specific needs.

Distance learning:

In some cases, schools are having students work entirely online. While this option may seem like the safer protection from COVID-19, there are still many things that students and parents should take into consideration when starting virtual learning.

The most important thing is to ensure you are properly equipped. Be sure to attend all your school’s meetings, remain informed on local health guidelines and create a schedule to help meet your educational goals. Check out this article from Tech at Home to learn more about the resources needed to ensure a seamless distance learning experience.

Taking classes online can also have a mental and emotional impact on students. According to the CDC, ensuring students mental and emotional well-being is met during distance learning is crucially important when deciding how to continue your education during COVID-19.

There are several things you can do to ensure valuable emotional and social time is met while learning online, including: Identify lunch times or virtual hang outs with other students, ask your school about connectivity plans, create opportunities to be physically active during the day and consider appropriate coping mechanisms for stress and anxiety.

In-person and online learning:

Many schools are also considering a mix of both learning styles considering COVID-19. In a recent article by the Washington Post, 44 percent of parents of children in K-12 schools wanted a mixture of both distance and in-class learning.

A mixture of both learning styles may help vulnerable students protect themselves against COVID-19 while still providing the important day-to-day social interactions afforded by traditional classrooms.

One thing is certain: chronic disease patients are facing a tough decision this fall, and ensuring you are properly informed and equipped to make the right decision is crucial in protecting your family, friends and community.

If you’re still unsure what is best for you or your child, be sure to review your school district’s online resources, ask questions and check out this helpful article from the CDC to ensure you and your school are properly equipped!